Slow Down and Move Over

Although road maintenance crews come to mind when thinking of orange directional signs and work zones, other workers perform job duties near the road as well, including utility and tree-trimming crews.

Streets and highways are lined with power poles and electrical equipment, and narrow roadways often require crews like ours to place their equipment in traffic lanes. Their work is often taken for granted but benefits us all; and, like everyone, they deserve a safe workplace. Be alert to utility crews and other work zone workers for their safety as well as yours.

According to the National Work Zone Safety Information Clearinghouse, 762 fatal crashes and 842 deaths occurred in work zones crashes in 2019: up from 672 fatal crashes and 755 deaths in 2018. Of those fatalities, 135 were workers. An estimated 115,000 work zone crashes occurred in 2019, resulting in 39,000 people injured.

To help keep roadside crews safe:

  • Keep a safe distance between your vehicle and traffic barriers, trucks, construction equipment, and workers.
  • Be patient. Traffic delays are sometimes unavoidable, so allow time for unexpected setbacks in your schedule.
  • Obey all signs and road crew flag instructions.
  • Merge early and be courteous to other drivers.
  • Use your headlights at dusk and during inclement weather.
  • Minimize distractions. Avoid activities such as operating a radio, applying makeup and eating while driving.

Don’t make the jobs of road workers, utility crews, tree trimmers and others who work near traffic more dangerous. Slow down when approaching a work zone and move over for first responders and work crews on the side of the road.

Could ‘Texas-Sized’ Outages Happen in Western Kentucky?

The recent widespread outages that took place in Texas because of historic winter storms catches our attention and causes us to wonder, could that happen here? While historic natural events can overtake even the best laid plans and precautions, Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative (JPEC), along with Big Rivers Electric Corporation (Big Rivers), have taken steps to mitigate the effects of nature when it is within our control. JPEC is a member-owner of Big Rivers, which provides wholesale power needs to our service area. Big Rivers is a participant in a larger organization called the Midcontinent Independent System Operator (MISO). MISO members are required to own enough capacity to cover their own needs at peak times, plus additional reserves.  The idea is that if some members have trouble with their generation, other members have reserves that can pick up the slack. Big Rivers owns over 1,000 MW of very reliable coal, hydro, and natural gas generation. At times when Big Rivers generation is offline for maintenance, they purchase energy from the MISO market. They can also purchase energy from the MISO market when it can be purchased at a lower cost than it can be generated.

There are several significant differences between the electricity markets in Texas and Western Kentucky. Not enough of the Texas wind, coal and natural gas generation was designed to operate in extremely cold conditions. When weather stressed the equipment, generation from all sources began to fail just as loads were rising. Big Rivers generation was designed to operate in extreme temperatures. Texas relies more on natural gas than Big Rivers. Transportation issues can make it difficult to get natural gas to power plants when it is needed most. At our coal plants, the fuel inventory sits next to the plant. Finally, electricity sales are deregulated in Texas. Some consumers chose to pay the spot market price for their energy, which can often be cheaper, but the price can be too volatile for individual consumers. We believe that fair, just and reasonable rates provide protection from wild market swings. The rates that JPEC consumer-members pay are set by the Kentucky Public Service Commission.

As a member-owner of Big Rivers, JPEC has a say in how Big Rivers assembles it portfolio of generation resources. We believe that a mix of fuels in well maintained/efficient generation best serves our members. Big Rivers will soon be adding solar generation to its current mix of coal, natural gas, and hydro generation, such as the McCracken County Solar development. This mix further reduces our reliance upon any one fuel source.

JPEC is part of a nationwide network of electric cooperatives. Because the national network of transmission and distribution is and interconnected grid, energy can be acquired that makes up for a lack of generation if that need occurs.

JPEC Drives 1.5 Million Safe Miles

Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative (JPEC) has achieved another safety goal, driving 1.5 million miles without a recordable vehicle accident. Each year, JPEC employees drive vehicles more than 600,000 miles while performing work in our service area, that’s roughly 50,000 miles each month or 1,650 miles each day!

“This is a great example of what happens when the people of an organization strive to work as safely as possible each and every day. By remaining focused on our number one initiative, safety, we will continue to meet and exceed our goals,” said JPEC President & CEO, Greg Grissom. “We are prepared to buckle up for more safe driving. Our next goal is 2 million miles!”

JPEC sets internal safety goals each year and measures common safety metrics against high performing cooperatives across the nation in an effort to continuously elevate their performance. The Cooperative plans to commemorate the event with a custom sticker and picture that will be hung at its headquarters in Paducah, Ky.

Know the Risks of DIY Tree Trimming

Trees add immeasurable value to your property but maintaining them comes with a cost. They need pruning, sometimes heavy trimming or removal.

“We know hiring professionals to do some of these tasks goes against that independent streak some of our consumers have,” says Greg Grissom, president and CEO of Jackson Purchase Energy, “But trimming and removing trees can be dangerous and even deadly. Before attempting any work yourself, please understand the dangers.”

The most common types of serious tree trimming accidents are:

  • Electrocution. You can be seriously injured or killed if you come into contact with an electric line. It’s easy to misjudge the height of a tree or length of a branch. If there’s a chance power lines might be involved at all, always call your electric utility first and its experts will come out and advise you. Even when you think there’s room, if the wind blows a limb into a power line as you’re trimming it, you can be electrocuted.
  • Falling. You can be seriously injured or killed if you fall from a tree. Pruning branches or trimming out dead or overgrown limbs sometimes requires getting into the tree. Always make sure you are using appropriate safety harnesses and ropes when climbing. Also wear safety googles, hard hat, gloves, long-sleeve shirt, long pants and appropriate work shoes. Before climbing, inspect the tree to make sure no power lines run through or near the tree.
  • Being struck. You can be seriously injured or killed if you are struck by falling trees or limbs. Improper cutting can cause the tree to fall where you hadn’t planned. Always have two escape routes planned before you begin in case the tree starts going the wrong way. A falling tree hits the ground with great force. Branches and limbs crack, bounce, snap and recoil, especially if dead wood is present. Snapped branches can be flung surprisingly far in multiple directions. Never turn your back to a falling tree, and always wear a hard hat.
  • Overestimating. You can be seriously injured or killed if you overestimate your abilities.

“The most important safety reminder for any project is: Don’t get in over your head,” notes Grissom. “If you feel uneasy about the work you are about to perform, call a professional tree-trimming service to handle the job. The money you think you’ll save doing it yourself cannot buy back your health.”

Article Sourced from KEC

JPEC Sending Mutual Aid to a Sister Electric Cooperative

Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative (JPEC) is sending two crews to aid a sister Cooperative in Eastern Kentucky. Two five-men crews from JPEC will go to Big Sandy Rural Electric Cooperative this morning to assist with restoration efforts caused by winter weather that continues to devastate the region. At its peak, 8,500 of the Cooperative’s 12,745 consumer-members were without electricity. As of this morning, nearly 4,900 remain. Big Sandy RECC is located in Paintsville, Ky.

“Cooperatives helping each other is what we do. Once we were able to assess the local needs of our service area, we were more than willing to send crews to assist in the restoration efforts taking place at Big Sandy RECC,” said JPEC President & CEO, Greg Grissom.

JPEC is part of a nationwide network of electric cooperatives that assist each other in times of natural disasters. We have provided assistance numerous times to other cooperatives in Kentucky and across the southeast following hurricanes, tornadoes and ice storms.

Because the national network of transmission and distribution infrastructure owned by electric cooperatives is built to federal standards, line crews from any co-op in America can arrive on the scene ready to provide emergency support, secure in their knowledge of the system’s engineering.

A Christmas Gift

Recognizing the difficult times that so many people in our area are experiencing, Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative (JPEC) wanted to assist a non-profit organization that helps families throughout the six counties they serve.

“The difficulties of 2020 are forcing families to make decisions that come down to basic necessities and we wanted to help. Our donation alone certainly won’t change the world, but we are proud to know that it will make a difference one child at a time,” said JPEC President & CEO, Greg Grissom.

Starfish Orphan Ministry, located in Paducah, Ky., strives to help children who do not have a complete family. Locally they serve between 4,000 and 5,000 families each year in western Kentucky, providing clothes, shoes, coats, car seats, baby items, housewares, toiletries, furniture, beds and appliances. Starfish Orphan Ministry also provides Christmas gifts for children who would not have Christmas otherwise. Because of the pandemic, many planned fundraisers have not taken place. The usual toy drives to help with collecting close to 1,800 gifts, did not take place this year due to donors limiting the number of non-profits they are helping, which has left Starfish with a toy deficit.

Starfish Orphan Ministry executive director, Laura Roberts said, “We had no idea how God would provide this year, but we didn’t lose faith. When JPEC called and said that they were making this unexpected donation, we were so excited, because it will go a long way in providing the toys and gifts that we still need! This gift will impact about 100 children in our community who have been through a tough year already!”

Electrical Infrastructure Installed at Ballard County Industrial Park

Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative (JPEC) recently installed the electrical infrastructure needed to power-up businesses that will one day locate to the Ballard County Industrial Park.

Located on Buck Road just east of Wickliffe, the property was purchased from a local family in 1996 as a prospective industrial park. Since then, the property has been in the development stage.

“This year’s activities have made the vision that much more of a reality. We look forward to the job growth that will one day take place in this area,” says Ballard County Judge Executive, Todd Cooper. “Two Rivers Fisheries and Angie Yu have worked tirelessly to market the industrial site over the last two years. Their work has been instrumental in advertising the site’s development.”

Seven Chinese-owned companies, who are in the Asian Carp industry, are set to bring business to the area by early 2021. Construction for infrastructure, including roads, water, sewer and electricity were all set to be put in place during 2020. In all, these seven employers are projected to add 100-150 jobs to the area.

"The economic health of a cooperative is directly tied to its members and JPEC is proud to supply safe and reliable electric service to businesses that come to our area and to the homes of families they will employee,” said JPEC President & CEO, Greg Grissom.

Big Rivers and JPEC Partner for Tornado Recovery Week

BIG RIVERS AND JPEC PARTNER FOR TORNADO RECOVERY WEEK

Employees Volunteer for Projects in Mayfield and Hopkins County

HOPKINS COUNTY AND MAYFIELD, Ky. (March 10, 2022) – Big Rivers Electric Corporation and Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative (JPEC) employees volunteered time and skills this week for two tornado recovery projects in western Kentucky. While many employees donated and volunteered in the immediate aftermath of the December 10th tornado, Big Rivers and JPEC wanted to set aside time for people to help with long-term community needs.

As part of this week’s initiative, approximately 25 employees traveled to two project sites based on skills and location:

  • Hopkins County Debris Removal and Demolition: Big Rivers employee teams worked by hand and with skid steers to clear debris at tornado-damaged areas.
  • Mayfield-Graves County Fairgrounds Tornado Relief Center: Big Rivers and JPEC teams aided with unloading and sorting donations, checked in impacted families, and picked up debris.

Natural disasters receive heavy coverage from volunteers in the early weeks, but recovery is often a much longer process. Since rebuilding from the Kentucky tornados is expected to continue for months, Big Rivers and JPEC hope to organize future weeks to support ongoing community projects and provide opportunities for additional employees to volunteer.

 

Photos and videos will also be available following each project on the Big Rivers Electric and JPEC Facebook page.

You Can Help Protect Us – Slow Down and Move Over

Slow Down and Move Over

Although road maintenance crews come to mind when thinking of orange directional signs and work zones, other workers perform job duties near the road as well, including utility and tree-trimming crews.

Streets and highways are lined with power poles and electrical equipment, and narrow roadways often require crews like ours to place their equipment in traffic lanes. Their work is often taken for granted but benefits us all; and, like everyone, they deserve a safe workplace. Be alert to utility crews and other work zone workers for their safety as well as yours.

To help keep roadside crews safe:

  • Keep a safe distance between your vehicle and traffic barriers, trucks, construction equipment, and workers.
  • Be patient. Traffic delays are sometimes unavoidable, so allow time for unexpected setbacks in your schedule.
  • Obey all signs and road crew flag instructions.
  • Merge early and be courteous to other drivers.
  • Use your headlights at dusk and during inclement weather.
  • Minimize distractions. Avoid activities such as operating a radio, applying makeup and eating while driving.

Don’t make the jobs of road workers, utility crews, tree trimmers and others who work near traffic more dangerous. Slow down when approaching a work zone and move over for first responders and work crews on the side of the road.

Like us on Facebook and view our website at www.jpenergy.com for up-to-date information.

Article Sourced from Safe Electricity

Honoring Local Heroes in Hard Hats

Paducah, KY, Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative (JPEC) joins the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association in celebrating its 25 lineworkers as part of National Lineworker Appreciation Day on Monday, April 11. Our lineworkers represent over 400 years of experience collectively.

Every day, lineworkers face immense risks. Carrying heavy gear, they regularly scale 40-foot poles near high-voltage power lines, and often in the wake of nature’s worst moments. It’s no wonder their profession is among the 25 most dangerous jobs in the country. 

JPEC lineworkers maintain nearly 3,000 miles of high voltage lines across six counties, keeping the lights on for over 30,000 consumer-member accounts. 

On April 11, you’re invited to #ThankALineworker by celebrating the men and women who work around the clock, putting their lives on the line to keep power flowing, something we all appreciate.   

“Our lineworkers are heroes in every sense of the word,” said JPEC President & CEO, Greg Grissom “We count on them to get us through some of our darkest hours, day or night and we appreciate their dedication to the service of our consumer-members. We dedicate this special day of recognition to express our gratitude.”

JPEC sending crews to help neighboring cooperative following damaging storms

Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative (JPEC) is sending two crews to aid West Kentucky Rural Electric Cooperative (WKRECC) in western Kentucky. Two four-men crews from JPEC will go to WKRECC this morning to assist with restoration efforts caused by storms that passed through our area last night. At its peak, 14,407 of the Cooperative’s consumer-members were without electricity. As of this morning, nearly 13,600 remain.

“WKRECC is a neighbor cooperative, but they are also our friends and our family. We are happy to assist WKRECC in their time of need just as they would be happy to assist JPEC if the roles were reversed. Once we are able to assess the local needs of our service area, our crews will move to assist with the restoration efforts taking place at WKRECC,” said JPEC President & CEO, Greg Grissom.

JPEC is part of a nationwide network of electric cooperatives that assist each other in times of natural disasters. They have provided assistance numerous times to other cooperatives in Kentucky and across the southeast following hurricanes, tornadoes and ice storms.

Because the national network of transmission and distribution infrastructure owned by electric cooperatives is built to federal standards, line crews from any co-op in America can arrive on the scene ready to provide emergency support, secure in their knowledge of the system’s engineering.

Electrical Safety

Electrical Safety

Electricity lights homes and businesses, provides warmth and keeps appliances and equipment running smoothly. Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative wants to provide these electrical safety tips to avoid hazards both inside and outdoors.

Staying safe on the road

  1. If you see a downed power line, call 9-1-1 to report it and stay in your car. You cannot tell by looking or listening if the power line is deenergized.
  2. Do not drive over a downed power line.
  3. The only time you should exit is if your vehicle or cab is on fire. If this is the case, make a solid jump from the car or cab without touching it, landing with both feet together. Then, hop away with your feet together as far as you can.

Staying safe outside

  1. Keep at least 10 feet away from overhead power lines. Keep any items you are carrying or using, such as long poles or other extended equipment, 10 feet away from power lines at all times.
  2. Make sure that all outside outlets are ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protected.
  3. Before digging, call 8-1-1 or your state’s underground locating service. Buried lines such as electric, gas, water, sewer and other lines bring services indoors.
  4. When you see lightning, take shelter inside the house, shop or a hard-topped vehicle for protection. If you are swimming or in a hot tub, get out. Water is an electrical conductor that is dangerous during a storm.

Staying safe inside

  1. Have a qualified electrician/licensed contractor check for hazards if you notice the following: dimming lights, a sizzling or buzzing sound, the smell of warm plastic, a switch plate that feels warm or looks scorched, sparks when plugging in or unplugging items or circuits that trip often.
  2. When working with electrical equipment inside the house or shop, be aware that electrical equipment can spark when flammable vapors, gases or dust are present.
  3. Do not overstretch a cord or use frayed or damaged cords.
  4. During storms, lightning can enter homes through corded phones, televisions, radios or computers. Lightning can also travel through plumbing, so do not take a bath, shower or wash dishes when you see lightning strikes.

 

Follow us on Facebook and Instagram. You can also view our website at www.jpenergy.com.

 

Article Sourced from Safe Electricity

Electrical Safety Tips for Your Home

Whether you rent or own your home, everyone should be aware of warning signs that indicate potential danger in your electrical system and unsafe practices.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, electrical failures or malfunctions are present in an estimated average of 47,000 home structure fires per year in the United States, which result in 430 deaths, 1,280 injuries, and $1.5 billion in property damage. Based on figures from the National Center for Biotechnology Information, electrical injuries in general cause approximately 1,000 deaths per year in the U.S.

Make it a habit to look for the following warning signs of electrical safety hazards in your home on a regular basis:

  • Outlets and light switches that are warm to the touch.
  • Outlets that are loose, scorched or discolored.
  • Wall or light switches that cause shocks upon contact.
  • Strange smells (such as something burning or overheating).
  • Smoke or sparks.
  • Exposed wires.
  • Lack of GFCIs (ground fault circuit interrupters) on certain outlets (those near a water source or that could get wet).
  • Lack of AFCIs (arc fault circuit interrupters); these help to prevent fires and are required in new builds.
  • Faulty appliances.
  • Evidence of frequent blown fuses or circuit breakers.
  • Missing or broken wall plates.
  • Delayed responses after switching lights on or off.
  • Flickering lights.

Another item to pay attention to is overloading electrical outlets. If you have multiple electronics, appliances, and other items plugged into a single outlet using extension cords and large outlet strips, you risk overloading your electrical system and creating an electrical hazard.

If you notice electrical issues, make sure items are addressed immediately by a qualified electrician.

Like us on Facebook and view our website at www.jpenergy.com for more tips like this.

Stay Safe Out There

Jackson Purchase Energy Announces Scholarship Winners

Paducah, KY - Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative (JPEC) recently awarded ten $1,000 scholarships to high school seniors across the co-op’s service area.  To be eligible, applicant’s primary residence must be served by JPEC and they must be a high school senior who plans to enroll full-time at an accredited university or community college no later than the fall semester.

Recipients are:

McCracken County – Bailey Bowland, Brooke Bowling and Morgan Guess

Marshall County – Griffin Darnall and Tyler Treas

Graves County – Ellie Miller

Livingston County – Robert Schmitt and Brandon Henson

Ballard County – Emily Walker

Carlisle County – Carter Gibson

“It is always rewarding to invest in the future of young people,” said JPEC President & CEO Greg Grissom, “these students will grow up to hold positions in a variety of areas and we hope they are proud to say that their electric cooperative helped them along the way.”  

JPEC supports schools throughout their service area by participating in learning experiences and conducting electrical safety demonstrations.  To learn more about our community involvement, like us on Facebook and view our website at www.jpenergy.com.

Proposed changes to JPEC Bylaws are available for review Members will vote on the bylaws June 21

The Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative Board of Directors has reviewed and approved proposed changes to the Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative Bylaws.

In advance of a membership vote on June 21, the changes to the bylaws are available for review using the link below. The proposed bylaws are also published in the June 2021 Kentucky Living magazine.

Changes to the bylaws are marked in red.

JPEC Bylaws - Proposed Changes 2021

Boating and Dock Safety

Boating and Dock Safety

 

If there is something wrong with the wiring in or near boats or docks, the electric currents can flow into the water. As a result, people swimming nearby can experience an electrical shock. Victims can completely lose muscle control, suffer from ventricular fibrillation, and die from electric shock. That’s why you should never swim near electric-powered boats or docks.

 

Tips to prevent electrical injuries on boats and in the water:

  • Don’t swim near docks or boats.
  • If you notice a tingling sensation while swimming, get out of the water quickly and avoid metal objects like ladders.
  • Don’t use frayed or damaged cords or any that have had the prongs removed.
  • Install GFCIs on your boat and have them tested once a month.
  • Equipment leakage circuit interrupters protect swimmers nearby from potential electrical leakage into the water around your boat. Consider installing them on your boat.
  • Periodically have a professional marine electrician inspect your boat’s electrical system

 

Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and view our website at www.jpenergy.com for up-to-date information.

 

Article Sourced from Electricity Safety Foundation International

First Day at New Facility

(Paducah, KY) June 7th, 2021 is a proud day for Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative (JPEC) consumer-members and employees. Today marks the first day we are open to the public at our new facility on Highway 60.

We were honored to host the Color Guard from American Legion post 236 who raised our American flag for the first time. Shorty thereafter, a ribbon cutting took place to inaugurate the first day of business in the new building.

The new cooperative headquarters positions JPEC to better serve our consumer-members and the community while accommodating calculable expansions in our service territory for the next 50 years.     

Greater Paducah Economic Development Announcement – Blockware Mining

Blockware Mining, a technology-based company specializing in cryptocurrency mining, announces that they will be locating a new technology center in Industrial Park West.  See the full announcement by clicking on the link below.

Blockware Announcement

Drive-thru registration coming up!

We're getting ready to see you!

Drive-thru registration for annual meeting

When: Tuesday, June 28 from 9-2:00 PM

Where: JPEC headquarters 6525 US HWY 60 W

What to bring: Photo ID

Stop by and see us for your free bucket, bulb and gift! We hope to see you there.

250,000 Hours With No Lost Time

Jackson Purchase Energy Announces No Lost Time

Paducah, KY - As of June 15th, the employees of Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative (JPEC) have reached another safety milestone, 250,000 without a lost time injury due to an on-the-job incident. Due to the number of employees at JPEC, 250,000 hours is the threshold to qualify the Cooperative for the Governor’s Safety and Health Award.   

“Above all else, the core principle that our cooperative is built upon is safety,” said JPEC President & CEO Greg Grissom.  “Safety is present in everything we do, from our work practices to the electricity that comes to your home through our distribution lines.  We strive for safety in all we do.  This milestone reflects our desire to move in a safe and positive direction.”

During the time that these hours have accumulated, JPEC’s workforce of 68 men and women have worked through numerous major weather events on the JPEC system as well as providing mutual aid to fellow electric cooperatives near and far. 

JPEC also desires to make the communities they serve as safe as possible by providing on-site safety demonstrations for schools, fire stations, public works departments, community events and more. Contact us today!

Take Cover When Storms are Brewing

Sometimes a storm pops up or changes direction without any warning, while other times it is forecast days in advance and follows its predicted course. In either case, knowing what to do right before, during and after a storm can help to keep you safe.

When stormy winds blow, follow these weather-related reminders from FEMA and the Red Cross:

  • Never seek shelter under an isolated tree, tower or utility pole, since lightning tends to strike tall objects.
  • Immediately vacate elevated areas such as hills, mountain ridges and peaks.
  • Get away from ponds, lakes and other bodies of water.
  • Stay away from objects that conduct electricity, including wires and fences (and golf clubs!). (Approximately 5 percent of annual lightning deaths and injuries in the United States happen on golf courses, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.)
  • Never lie flat on the ground.
  • Pick a safe place in your home, away from windows and doors, for family members to gather during a thunderstorm.
  • Know the difference between a watch and a warning for extreme weather such as a tornado or severe thunderstorm. A watch means that the weather is possible in and near the area. A warning means that severe weather has been reported by spotters or indicated by radar. A warning is more serious than a watch and means that there is imminent danger to life and property.

Once the storm is over, follow these safety tips from Safe Electricity:

  • Never step into a flooded basement or other standing water. The water could be covering electrical outlets, appliances or cords. Never touch (or use) electrical appliances, cords, wires or switches while you are wet or standing in water.
  • After a storm, a downed power line could be covered by standing water or debris. Never go near a downed line and warn others to stay away. If you see a downed line, call 9-1-1, and a crew will be dispatched to de-energize the power and address the problem safely.
  • The same safety know-how applies to a downed power line you might encounter while driving or after an auto accident. In either case, do not get out. Instead, call 9-1-1 to report the downed line (pull over first if you are driving). If you must exit your vehicle after an accident because of a fire or smoke, make a solid, clean jump out, landing with both feet together. Then make solid hops with your feet together, hopping as far away as you can.
  • If your home has been damaged by a flood, turn off the power to your house if it is safe to do so. (Do not turn power off at the breaker box while standing in water or in damp conditions.)
  • If the wiring, electrical system or appliances have been damaged by water, have your home inspected by an electrician; also, have appliances serviced by a qualified technician before using them.

Like us on Facebook for more updates and tips like these.

2022 Annual Meeting Summary

The annual meeting of consumer-members took place from 9 a.m.–2 p.m., Tuesday, June 28th, where 447 consumer-members registered using our drive-thru registration – a 31.5% increase in participation from 2021. Following registration, the cooperative held its virtual business meeting.

During the business meeting, JPEC Board Chairman, Erick Harris, opened the meeting by briefly commenting on a successful drive-thru registration and proceeded to open the business meeting. President and CEO, Greg Grissom gave the 2021 Financial Report. The chairman of election tellers informed the membership of the results of the proposed bylaw revisions and director elections for Districts 1, 2, 4 and 5. Consumer-members voted to accept proposed bylaw revisions, incumbent directors Josh Barnes, District 4; Kevin Bell, District 5; and Terry Teitloff, District 2; were re-elected to a second term. David Brown was elected as the cooperative’s newest director. Director Brown will represent District 1. Finally, Chairman Harris recognized retiring director, Dr. Ivus Crouch, with a resolution honoring him for his 22 years of service.    

“We chose to conduct our annual meeting virtually once again this year. We consider this year’s annual meeting a success, the weather was beautiful, and we had great participation from our membership. Thank you to all the employees that made this event possible and thank you to every consumer-member who came by and registered” said JPEC President & CEO, Greg Grissom, “it is always great to see the smiling faces of our members!” 

Consumer-members can view a recording of the JPEC 2022 annual meeting on our website at www.jpenergy.com

Thank you for your membership in this cooperative.

2021 Annual Meeting Summary

2021 Annual Meeting Summary

 

The annual meeting of consumer-members was again held in a non-traditional fashion this year. Drive-thru registration took place from 9 a.m.–2 p.m., Monday, June 21st, where 340 consumer-members registered.  Following registration, the cooperative held its business meeting.

During the business meeting, JPEC Board Chairman, Erick Harris, opened the meeting by briefly commenting on the successful construction of the new headquarters followed by an abbreviated business meeting. President and CEO, Greg Grissom then gave the 2020 Financial Report. Finally, Chairman Harris, reported that the membership had voted to accept recent bylaw revisions. 

“Because the annual meeting is planned well in advance and we were unaware of when in-person restrictions would be lifted, we chose to conduct our annual meeting virtually once again this year. We consider this year’s annual meeting a success as even the rain held-off for most of the day. Thank you to all the employees that made this event possible and thank you to every consumer-member who participated” said JPEC President & CEO, Greg Grissom, “it was great to see smiling faces once again! We hope to see you in person next year.”  

Consumer-members can view a recording of the JPEC 2021 annual meeting on our website at www.jpenergy.com.  

Thank you for your membership in this cooperative.

Electrical Receptacle Safety

Electrical Receptacle Safety

 

Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative (JPEC) reminds consumers-members about the three types of electrical receptacles designed with safety in mind. The three types of receptacles are tamper-resistant receptacles, ground fault circuit interrupters, and arc fault circuit interrupters.

Receptacles pose dangers to children and adults alike. A curious child may insert a paper clip, coin, or key into an outlet’s openings. Accidents or carelessness with plugged-in appliances around water or simply faulty receptacles and wiring can cause electrical shocks and fires leading to disaster and tragedy.

“Electrical safety is always improving,” says Greg Grissom, President and CEO at JPEC. “There are many consumer safety devices that are now required by code and are standard in any newer home, or available and can be installed to make your home safer.”

Here are three types of electrical receptacles installed today.

TRRTamper-resistant receptacles have an interior spring-loaded cover that closes off the slots of the receptacle until a plug is inserted. They open only when two prongs of a plug are inserted simultaneously.

GFCIGround fault circuit interrupters have been around for many years and are required for receptacles in bathrooms, kitchens, and laundry rooms—wherever there may be water and/or dampness present. GFCIs have “reset” and “test” buttons associated with them. GFCIs are circuit breakers that stop the flow of electricity the instant they detect an imbalance in the current going to and returning from equipment along the circuit.

AFCIArc fault circuit interrupters prevent an electrical fire in your home due to “arcing.” An arc fault is an unintended arc created by current flowing through an unplanned path. Arcing creates high-intensity heating, resulting in burning particles that can ignite nearby material like wood or insulation.

If a home doesn’t have these three life-saving types of receptacles, contact a qualified electrician about installing them where needed

Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and view our website at www.jpenergy.com for up-to-date information.

Sources: National Fire Protection Association, Consumer Product Safety Commission, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, National Electrical Manufacturers Association,deckerhomeservices.com, Eaton.com

Don’t Let Unsafe Actions Make Waves in Summer Fun

Don't Let Unsafe Actions Make Waves in Summer Fun

Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative wants you and your loved ones to stay safe when enjoying water recreation activities this summer. Below are a few tips from Safe Electricity.

Be sure to check weather forecasts. Postpone your plans if a thunderstorm is expected, as the risks for lightning strikes are especially high in or near bodies of water. Remember the advice from the National Weather Service (NWS), “When thunder roars, go indoors.”

You are not safe from lightning strikes while outside, so once you hear thunder, get to a safe shelter such as an enclosed building with electricity or plumbing or an enclosed metal-topped vehicle with its windows up. Wait until at least 30 minutes have passed without thunder to return outside.

Be aware of your surroundings. Always check the location of nearby power lines before boating or fishing. Make sure you are casting the line away from power lines to avoid potential contact.

Do not raise a mast or antenna when your boat is near a power line. Never attempt to move a power line out of the way so that a boat can pass underneath. Maintain a safe distance of at least 10 feet between your boat and nearby power lines. Keep in mind that water levels are constantly changing, altering the distance between the water and the line.

If your boat does come in contact with a power line, do not enter the water. The water could be energized. Instead, stay in the boat and avoid touching anything metal until help arrives or until your boat is no longer in contact with the line.

Do not swim around docks with electrical equipment or boats plugged into shore power. If you are in the water and feel a tingle of electric current, shout to let others know, try to stay upright, tuck your legs up to make yourself smaller, and swim away from anything that could be energized. Do not head to boat or dock ladders to get out.

If you see someone who you suspect is getting shocked, do not immediately jump in to save them.  Throw them a float, turn off the shore power connection at the meter base, and/or unplug shore power cords. Try to eliminate the source of electricity as quickly as possible; then call for help.

To help prevent the risk of electricity entering the water, have your boat and dock electrical systems regularly inspected and maintained by a professional familiar with marine electrical codes.

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High electric bills are result of years of unsound energy policies

by Robert Berry, President and CEO of Big Rivers Electric Corporation and Tony Campbell, President and CEO of East Kentucky Power Cooperative

In recent months, electric utility customers across the U.S. have received a shock as they opened their monthly electric power bills. The high costs they are experiencing are largely the result of years of unsound government energy policies, which have cut options to fuel reliable energy. U.S. electricity producers have been forced to depend more on natural gas and must compete against foreign nations for our domestic natural gas supplies. Those nations are willing to pay 1,000 percent more than U.S. consumers are accustomed to paying. Some, notably Russia, have taken advantage of the situation to weaponize energy to advance their radical interests.

U.S. policy-makers have enthusiastically incentivized solar and wind generators, regardless of how well the operating characteristics of those technologies match up with U.S. energy needs. But when those solar and wind resources do not perform—an occurrence as predictable as the sun setting and the seasons changing—energy producers must turn to reliable 24/7/365 thermal energy resources. For large-scale energy production, that means natural gas, coal and nuclear. But, facing ever-stricter regulations and price competition from heavily subsidized renewable resources, coal and nuclear plants increasingly are being driven into retirement.

In 2020, the U.S. added 27.6 gigawatts (GW) of solar and wind resources, along with 6.6 GW of natural gas; virtually no coal or nuclear resources were added. In fact, over the past decade, 95 GW of coal capacity has been shut down, along with 12 nuclear reactors. Today, no new coal plants are being built in the U.S., and only two nuclear reactors are under construction. As a consequence, when solar and wind do not show up, electricity providers increasingly must turn to one key flexible resource —natural gas. Today, 40% of U.S. electricity generation is fueled by natural gas, up from 17% in 2001.

Promoters of solar and wind undoubtedly will maintain that utility-scale battery technology is the silver bullet to solve renewables’ intermittency problem. But today, less than 1% of U.S. solar and wind capacity is backed up by batteries. The technology for large-scale storage remains largely in the developmental stage. Rapid deployment of large, utility-scale batteries to back up hundreds of gigawatts of solar and wind resources will require aggressive, expensive growth of battery-manufacturing capacity. Today, much of the mineral content necessary to produce lithium-ion batteries—the foremost technology being pursued for both utility energy storage and electric vehicles—comes from nations like China and Russia, whose interests do not align well with the U.S.

As the U.S. is learning at this very moment, we must account for differences in foreign interests when it comes to energy. In recent years, Russia has supplied one-third of Europe’s natural gas for heating and manufacturing. In response to Russia’s recent invasion of Ukraine, those nations imposed sanctions, so Russia cut the flow of natural gas. As a result, gas prices are spiking around the globe. Large-scale U.S. purchasers of natural gas, including East Kentucky Power Cooperative and Big Rivers Electric, have been accustomed to paying $2 to $3 per million BTU for natural gas; meanwhile, power generation counterparts in Europe and Asia are paying $20 to $30. In fact, in recent months, spot prices in those regions have shot up as high as $50 to $60 per million BTU. Recently Big Rivers decided to convert one of its coal-fired generating plants to natural gas due to those low gas prices only to see the same gas prices spike over $9 to $10 per million BTU.

For U.S. electric customers, this means high electric bills. President Biden recently pledged to expand U.S. natural gas exports to assist our European friends. (It is worth noting that U.S overseas natural gas exports are a new development. In 2016, the U.S. exported very little liquefied natural gas overseas. By the end of this year, the U.S. will have more export capacity than any other nation on the globe, nearly 14 billion cubic feet of gas per day. Plus, each day, the U.S. exports to Mexico another 7 billion cubic feet via pipelines.) As a result, Americans find themselves in the awkward position of bidding against foreign nations for our own domestic supplies of natural gas.

Meanwhile, the pressures that have constrained and reduced coal and nuclear production are catching up with the natural gas industry. Gas drillers who cut production during COVID’s economic doldrums have been slow to restart production, even though factories and stores roared back to life in 2021. Media reports suggest gas producers are reluctant to commit big dollars to drilling because of punitive regulatory risks. And even if they are willing, drillers face difficulties arranging financing due to pressure on banks to cut lending for fossil fuel production.

At a 2019 town hall in New Hampshire, President Biden famously stated he would jail the heads of fossil fuel companies. It was, perhaps, just election-season hyperbole, but his administration certainly wasted no time in targeting the industry. The Environmental Protection Agency is deploying an intensive barrage of regulations aimed at fossil fuels; this will hasten the closure of even more coal plants and further hinder the development of new natural gas capacity. These actions create tremendous uncertainty for financial partners, which are vital to the capital-intensive energy industry. As a result, financial institutions are abandoning fossil fuels or raising financing costs to prohibitive levels.

As with natural gas, U.S. coal producers suddenly have a lucrative opportunity to export coal to nations willing to pay much higher prices than the U.S. coal market has seen in recent years, creating steep upward cost pressure domestically, as well as a scarcity of available coal as mining companies face numerous challenges to restarting operations, including labor and equipment shortages, constrained rail transportation, high financing costs and regulatory resistance.

Recently, U.S. Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm visited EKPC’s solar farm near Lexington, Ky. During her visit, EKPC CEO Campbell informed Secretary Granholm that renewables play an important and growing role in energy production, especially to cut carbon emissions and address climate change. But he also informed her, if the U.S. goes too far too fast with the transition, it will seriously jeopardize the cost and reliability of America’s energy supply, which is critically important to the welfare of the American people and the American economy.

EKPC and Big Rivers are committed to doing everything we possibly can, by utilizing every tool available to us in protecting the reliability and cost-effectiveness of the energy we supply for 1.35 million Kentucky residents and businesses while moving toward a more sustainable future as technology allows. EKPC and Big Rivers believe in the “all-of-the-above” approach to maintain a more balanced resource portfolio by utilizing solar, hydro, coal, and natural gas in order to protect the environment and sustain reliable energy for our Member-Owners. We call on our nation’s leaders to make the same commitment and also to ensure the U.S. does not expose the cost and reliability of our abundant domestic energy supplies to the whims of radical interests, foreign nations and our enemies who have unscrupulously weaponized the world’s energy supply.

https://www.lanereport.com/157403/2022/07/op-ed-high-electric-bills-are-result-of-years-of-unsound-energy-policies/

811 – Call Before You Dig

August 11th is 811 day.  Did you know that every six minutes an underground utility line is damaged because someone dug without first calling 811? Call 811 before you dig to make sure you know what’s below. Even if you think you could get lucky or that digging one small hole (or two) won’t matter, don’t take for granted what lines might lurk beneath the soil in your yard or easement.

Before you use that post hole digger or other unearthing tools, STOP and call 811 to request that buried electric, gas, cable and other live lines in or near your yard be marked. The service is free but digging in an unmarked yard may not be.

You might think you don’t have time for that and ask yourself, what’s the worst that could happen?

YOU COULD DIE OR BECOME SERIOUSLY INJURED.

There are other consequences of blindly digging and taking a chance:

  • You could cause a power outage.
  • Hit a gas line and get burned or cause an evacuation in your neighborhood.
  • If you hit a telephone line or fiber optic line, you might lose your telephone, cable TV or internet service. Worse yet, it could interfere with your neighborhood’s emergency assistance technology.
  • You could be fined.

Although it all seems like “your” yard, utilities have the right of way to the live lines lurking under the ground in places where you might dig.

Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative reminds you that Call811.com lists the name and contact information for each state’s digging notification service. The site also lists the advance notice required for marking services, which is usually two days, not including the day you call, weekends or holidays.

As call811.com says, “Know what’s below.” Then dig safely.

Think Safety When Operating a Generator

A generator can be a valuable piece of equipment to keep appliances working during a power outage. Generators can be either temporary or permanently installed.

A permanent generator is wired into a house by a qualified electrician using a transfer switch that prevents a generator from feeding electricity back into overhead lines, which can be deadly for linemen.

A temporary generator is powered by gasoline and should not be attached to a circuit breaker, fuse, or outlet. Before ever purchasing a generator you need to know the wattage required to run the appliances you will attach to the generator. You also need to know the surge power, which is the power it takes to turn an appliance on.

Once you have purchased the proper generator, follow these tips from Safe Electricity to properly operate your generator:

  • Read and follow all manufacturer operating instructions to properly ground the generator. Be sure you understand them before hooking up the generator.
  • Never operate a generator in a confined area, such as a garage. Generators can produce numerous gases, including toxic and deadly carbon monoxide. They require proper ventilation.
  • Generators pose electrical risks especially when operated in wet conditions. Use a generator only when necessary when the weather creates wet or moist conditions. Protect the generator by operating it under an open, canopy-like structure on a dry surface where water cannot form puddles or drain under it. Always ensure that your hands are dry before touching the generator.
  • When you refuel the generator, make sure the engine is cool to prevent a fire, should the tank overflow.
  • There should be nothing plugged into the generator when you turn it on. This prevents a surge from damaging your generator and appliances.
  • Be sure to keep children and pets away from the generator, which could burn them.
  • Shut down the generator properly. Before shutting down a generator, turn off and unplug all appliances and equipment being powered by the generator.
  • Remember maintenance between uses. It is also a good idea to inspect the fuel and oil filters, spark plug, oil level and fuel quality and to start the generator on a regular basis before an emergency situation occurs.

Like us on Facebook and view our website at www.jpenergy.com for up-to-date information.

Stay Safe!

Preventing Electrical Fires

Electricity is an essential part of our everyday lives. Because of this, it can be easy to let our guard down when it comes to our safety around it. Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative encourages you to take steps to keep your family safe and prevent electrical fires.

The Red Cross estimates that after a fire has started, you have just two minutes to escape your home. In order to exit your home safely, education and preparation are your best tools for staying safe. With the two-minute goal in mind, construct and communicate with all family members about an escape plan. Look for two ways to exit each room in the home, practice emergency evacuation plans several times a year, and choose a meeting place outside of the home.

Safe Electricity offers the following checklist to help find possible issues with your electrical system or appliances before they become a fire hazard in your home:

  • Electrical outlets – Check for loose-fitting plugs and loose wall receptacles. Replace missing or broken wall plates so wiring and components are not exposed.
  • Electrical wiring – Check for loose wires and loose lighting fixtures. Listen for popping or sizzling sounds behind walls. If light switches are hot to the touch or lights spark and flicker, immediately shut them off at the circuit breaker and contact a qualified electrician to make repairs.
  • Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs) – Make sure GFCIs are installed in your kitchen, bathrooms, laundry, workshop, basement, garage, and outdoor outlets. GFCIs help protect against electrical shock. Use the test and reset button monthly to ensure they are working properly.
  • Plugs – Do not remove the grounding pin (third prong) to make a three-prong plug fit a two-conductor outlet.
  • Cords – Make sure cords are not frayed or cracked, placed under carpets or rugs, tightly wrapped around any object, or located in high traffic areas. Do not nail or staple them to walls, floors, or other objects.
  • Extension cords – These are not intended as permanent household wiring, so use them on a temporary basis only. If you find you need more electrical outlets, talk to an electrician about installing more so you will not need to use extension cords.
  • Circuit breakers/fuses – Check that circuit breakers are working properly. Fuses should be properly rated for the circuit they are protecting.

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Sources: Safe Electricity

Electrical Fires Can Be Avoided

Electrical Fires Can Be Avoided

Home fires started by malfunctioning electric appliances and fixtures or faulty wiring kill nearly 500 Americans each year and cause $1.3 billion in property damage. But many electrical fires can be prevented simply by following safe practices.

“The statistics are staggering and disturbing, “says Chris Perry, president, and CEO of Kentucky Electric Cooperatives. “But behind the statistics are our families, friends and neighbors. Hearing about anyone injured in an electrical fire is what’s most upsetting. Oftentimes, injuries or the fire itself could have been avoided.”

Electrical fires can start from improperly installed or outdated wiring; faulty outlets; loose connections between the wiring and switch, outlet or fixture; exposed wires on cords, including extension cords and device cords; problems with light fixtures, lamps and outdated appliances; and misuse of electrical cords or outlets, such as running cords under rugs or overloading circuits and outlets with extension receptacles, causing them to overheat.

If you experience dimming or flickering lights, unusual burning odors, unusual buzzing or sizzling sounds, or circuit breakers that trip repeatedly, contact a qualified electrician immediately. Don’t ignore these problem signs.

Installing smoke detectors is a proactive way to keep the home and family safe in case of a fire. Smoke detectors should be installed in every bedroom, outside each sleeping area, and on every level of a home and tested regularly.

A fire escape plan should also be in place and practiced regularly. Make sure any fire extinguishers are labeled for Class C, or electrical fires. Multipurpose extinguishers can be used on different types of firesand will be labeled with more than one class, like A-B-C.

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Stay Safe!

Power Outage – 10/14/2021

JPEC Power Outage

Consumer-members out of the Culp substation located near the McCracken/Marshall County line are experiencing an outage at this time, 1,801 consumer-members are affected.  At 8:36 AM Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative outage management software notified of a large outage out of the Culp substation.  Crews were immediately dispatched and upon arrival found a mechanical issue to be the cause of the outage.  Crews are able to temporarily move the electric load from the Culp substation to another location (a process called back-feeding) so the length of the outage is minimized.  Crews will remain onsite making repairs.  Once repairs are complete the electric load will transfer back to the Culp substation.  Transferring the load back to its original location will not produce service interruptions.  Approximate time of restoration for all circuits is 10:30 AM.  We appreciate everyone’s patience.

To report an outage:

  1. Texting your outage by texting OUT to 855-938-3622
  2. Dial 1-800-633-4044
  3. Keep track of current outages at www.jpenergy.com

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Make Sure Holiday Safety is on Your Menu

The kitchen can be a busy place during the holiday season, prepping and preparing favorite recipes (or sampling those favorite recipes).

Whether you are a seasoned cook or novice baker, it’s important to keep electrical safety in mind. In the United States alone, approximately 1,000 deaths occur each year as a result of electrical injuries, according to the National Institutes of Health. An additional non-fatal 30,000 shock incidents occur each year.

The following kitchen hazards may cause electric shock:

  • Damaged or worn electrical cords.
  • Equipment and appliances with improper or faulty wiring.
  • Using damp cloths or water for cooking or cleaning near sources of electricity.

The following tips may help prevent electric shock in your home:

  • Always read and follow an appliance’s operating instructions.
  • Always dry your hands before handling cords or plugs.
  • If an unplugged appliance cord gets wet or damp, do not plug it in until it is thoroughly dry.
  • Do not handle electrical cords or appliances when standing in water.
  • Pull on the plug, not the cord, to disconnect an appliance from an outlet.
  • To avoid damaging cords, don’t run them across walkways or underneath rugs. Draping them over walkways is also a tripping hazard.
  • Regularly inspect electrical cords and plugs for damaged insulation and exposed wiring; immediately discard any damaged item. Avoid using any cord or plug that is frayed, cracked, taped or otherwise questionable.
  • Only handle the insulated part of a plug or cord when disposing it.
  • Do not overload extension cords, multi-pack “power strips” or surge protectors with too many appliances or other items or plug them into each other. Use them only as a temporary solution, and not a permanent one.
  • Ensure extension cords, power strips and surge protectors are in good condition and the appropriate gauge for the job (the lower the number, the bigger the gauge and the greater the amperage and wattage).
  • Never remove the third (round or U-shaped) prong from a plug, which is a grounding/safety feature designed to reduce the risk of shock and electrocution.
  • If you have doubts about your home’s electrical system, have a licensed electrician evaluate wiring, outlets, and switches to verify they are in working order.
  • Educate yourself and everyone in your household on how to properly turn off your home’s power in case of an emergency.

Holiday Stressors

Holiday Stressors

Old songs call it the most wonderful time of the year, but the holiday season carries a high degree of stress for many people. The final months of the year include added pressures that may affect well-being, relationships, finances and other factors that contribute to anything but a merry and bright time.

Common causes of holiday stress

Although it sounds obvious, the best way to manage stressors is to remove or avoid them as much as possible. (This is often easier said than done.) Are there holiday-related events or tasks that are daunting? If so, consider the cost of not doing them (if there is a cost) versus keeping them on your list of obligations.

An overbooked holiday schedule is not the only thing that can cause strife and discontent, however. Here are other seasonal but common causes of stress, anxiety or depression:

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

As daylight hours become shorter, the rates of depression increase. If you are diagnosed with SAD, follow your doctor’s advice. Options include light therapy, counseling and medication.

Unrealistic expectations

These anxiety-producing thoughts and feelings can either come from external sources or ruminate in our minds. Outside expectations from family members, children, bosses, friends and others can leave you feeling like you are not enough or that you are spread way too thin. Internal expectations can push you to do more than is healthy or reasonable.

Financial difficulties and debt

According to a Magnify Money survey conducted in 2020, more than 30% of shoppers went into an average of $1,380 of debt for holiday gift buying and other expenses. This type of strain on your budget lasts far longer than the celebrations.

Loneliness and family issues

Memories of pleasant holidays or comparisons between your life and others enjoying the season can exacerbate loneliness. With so much focus on sharing time with others, people without positive familial or social connections can experience more sadness during the holiday season than during other times of the year.

Tips to alleviate stress

If you find you are overstressed, that you just do not feel like yourself, or that all the joy has been zapped from the most wonderful time of the year, try out some of these stress-alleviating techniques.

  • Identify negative self-talk and immediately refocus on a more positive message.
  • Maintain a healthy eating and exercise regimen to minimize physical stress.
  • Keep your distance from toxic or negative people. Focus on quality relationships.
  • Use positive affirmations and take the time to pamper yourself.

The holiday season may come with more stressors than at other times of the year, but self-care, tempering expectations, reaching out to positive people and sticking to both financial and time budgets will help you avoid a blue Christmas and instead focus on the warmth of the season.

Article Sourced from SafeElectricity.org

2021 Spirit of Giving Toy Drive

(December 17, 2021) Once again, the employees of Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative (JPEC) have opened their hearts and pockets to support their community through the WPSD Local 6 and Regions Bank Spirit of Giving Toy Drive.     

Each year kids in our area go without gifts.  That reality caused JPEC to support the Spirit of Giving Toy Drive.  Delivery problems and material shortages, that seem commonplace in our world today, may cause more kids to experience heartbreak rather than the joy that many of us felt as a kid on Christmas morning. 

The employees of JPEC set out to raise money to purchase gifts for this cause.  By December 10th, employees had raised $1,000.00.  To help support the effort, JPEC also made a company contribution of $500.00 to bring the combined total to $1,500.00!  Donations were used to purchase 116 toys that will bless families in our community.

“It really is better to give than to receive,” said JPEC President & CEO, Greg Grissom, “we are excited to play a part in events like this that support members of our community.  That’s what cooperatives are all about.”   

Follow JPEC on Facebook and view our website at www.jpenergy.com for up-to-date information on what your electric cooperative is doing in the communities we serve.

Ice on Power Lines

Please view the infographic concerning ice on power lines.

 

Donation to Support Tornado Victims

(December 28, 2021) As a not-for-profit, member-owned, electric cooperative, Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative (JPEC) has a desire to support the communities in our service area, but sometimes it goes beyond that.  “Our chief purpose is to serve, and we leverage our ability to help others when those opportunities present themselves,” said JPEC President & CEO, Greg Grissom, “when tragedy struck the West Kentucky Rural Electric Cooperative (WKRECC) system on December 10th, we were ready to help and so were the contractors that we employ.” 

Because of that deeply rooted desire, we strive to hire companies that share our values of service and community.  A great example of that was illustrated recently when Townsend Tree Service, a vender used by JPEC to maintain rights-of-way, made a donation to support communities in Marshall and Graves County.  Townsend Tree Service donated $25,000 to three organizations, the Marshall County Non-Profit Partnership Foundation, Graves County Schools and Mayfield Independent Schools.  Townsend Tree Service President & COO, Mick Saulman said “our hope is that this donation will bring some normalcy a little quicker to those impacted by recent tornados.”

We are proud to serve the portion of western Kentucky that we are blessed to call home and we are honored to work with companies like Townsend Tree Services to get the job done!       

Here’s wishing everyone a safe and happy new year!

Surge Protection

Surge Protection

A power surge is an unexpected increase in voltage, and it can occur from a variety of sources. Regardless of the cause, power surges can cause damage to electronic devices and equipment in your home.

See below for common causes of power surges and how you can protect your sensitive electronics:

Lightning - When lightning strikes an electrical system, the excess current must be channeled somewhere––unfortunately in many cases, it’s sent through a home. Your best bet is to unplug all unused devices and electronics during severe thunderstorms.

Electrical Overload - Electrical overload happens when devices or appliances are plugged into an outlet that can’t handle the required amount of voltage, or if multiple devices are plugged into one outlet through an extension cord. If you’re experiencing power surges due to electrical overload, it’s time to call a qualified electrician to evaluate your home’s circuits and electrical needs.

Faulty Wiring - If you notice signs of faulty wiring, like visible burns on outlets, buzzing sounds from outlets or frequently tripped circuit breakers, your home may be due for electrical wiring repairs and updates.

Power Outage - Sometimes, when electricity is being restored and reconnected, consumer-members may experience a quick surge in current. Similar to advice for a surge caused by lightning, it’s best to unplug sensitive electronics during the outage––then wait to plug them back in after power is fully restored.

Two ways you can take additional precautions to protect electronics in your home:

Point-of-use surge protection devices - Like power strips, can protect electronics during most surges. But remember, not all power strips include surge protection, so read the packaging label carefully before you buy, and don’t overload the power strip with too many devices. You can also install specialized electrical outlets that offer additional surge protection. Talk to a trusted electrician to learn more.

Whole-home surge protector - In most cases, whole-home suppressors are connected to your home’s service panel and include features like thermal fuses and notification capabilities that indicate when a device has been impacted by a surge. Whole-home surge protection prices vary based on the size of the home and suppressor. Whole-home suppressors should always be connected by a licensed electrician.

Occasional power surges are inevitable, but by unplugging devices when you think a surge may occur and using additional levels of protection like power strips or whole-home suppressors, you can better safeguard your sensitive electronics and devices.

Article Sourced from NRECA

JPEC Sending Aid to WKRECC

Co-op Sending Mutual Aid to a Neighbor Electric Cooperative

Paducah, KY – Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative (JPEC) is sending crews to aid West Kentucky Rural Electric Cooperative (WKRECC) in western Kentucky. Six two-men crews from JPEC will go to WKRECC this morning to assist with restoration efforts caused by the ice storm that passed through our area. As of this morning, 92 outages are impacting nearly 1,200 consumer-members.  

“We are happy to assist WKRECC in their time of need and hope to be able to help restore service to their membership as safely and quickly as possible. Now that we have been able to assess the local needs of our service area, our crews will move to assist with the restoration efforts taking place at WKRECC,” said JPEC President & CEO, Greg Grissom.

JPEC is part of a nationwide network of electric cooperatives that assist each other in times of natural disasters. They have provided assistance numerous times to other cooperatives in Kentucky and across the southeast following hurricanes, tornadoes and ice storms. 

Since the national network of transmission and distribution infrastructure is owned by electric cooperatives, distribution systems are built to federal standards. Line crews from any co-op in America can arrive on the scene ready to provide emergency support, secure in their knowledge of the system’s engineering.

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Please stay safe!

 

 

 

 

Call 811 Before You Dig

Call 811 Before You Dig

August 11th is 811 day.  Did you know that every six minutes an underground utility line is damaged because someone dug without first calling 811? Call 811 before you dig to make sure you know what’s below. Even if you think you could get lucky or that digging one small hole (or two) won’t matter, don’t take for granted what lines might lurk beneath the soil in your yard or easement.

Before you use that post hole digger or other unearthing tools, STOP and call 811 to request that buried electric, gas, cable and other live lines in or near your yard be marked. The service is free but digging in an unmarked yard may not be.

You might think you don’t have time for that and ask yourself, what’s the worst that could happen?

YOU COULD DIE OR BECOME SERIOUSLY INJURED.

There are other consequences of blindly digging and taking a chance:

  • You could cause a power outage.
  • Hit a gas line and get burned or cause an evacuation in your neighborhood.
  • If you hit a telephone line or fiber optic line, you might lose your telephone, cable TV or internet service. Worse yet, it could interfere with your neighborhood’s emergency assistance technology.
  • You could be fined.

Although it all seems like “your” yard, utilities have the right of way to the live lines lurking under the ground in places where you might dig.

Jackson Purchase Energy Cooperative reminds you that Call811.com lists the name and contact information for each state’s digging notification service. The site also lists the advance notice required for marking services, which is usually two days, not including the day you call, weekends or holidays.

As call811.com says, “Know what’s below.” Then dig safely.

Like us on Facebook and view our website at www.jpenergy.com for up-to-date information.

 

Think Safety When Operating a Generator

A generator can be a valuable piece of equipment to keep appliances working during a power outage. Generators can be either temporary or permanently installed.

A permanent generator is wired into a house by a qualified electrician using a transfer switch that prevents a generator from feeding electricity back into overhead lines, which can be deadly for linemen.

A temporary generator is powered by gasoline and should not be attached to a circuit breaker, fuse, or outlet. Before ever purchasing a generator you need to know the wattage required to run the appliances you will attach to the generator. You also need to know the surge power, which is the power it takes to turn an appliance on.

Once you have purchased the proper generator, follow these tips from Safe Electricity to properly operate your generator:

  • Read and follow all manufacturer operating instructions to properly ground the generator. Be sure you understand them before hooking up the generator.
  • Never operate a generator in a confined area, such as a garage. Generators can produce numerous gases, including toxic and deadly carbon monoxide. They require proper ventilation.
  • Generators pose electrical risks especially when operated in wet conditions. Use a generator only when necessary when the weather creates wet or moist conditions. Protect the generator by operating it under an open, canopy-like structure on a dry surface where water cannot form puddles or drain under it. Always ensure that your hands are dry before touching the generator.
  • When you refuel the generator, make sure the engine is cool to prevent a fire, should the tank overflow.
  • There should be nothing plugged into the generator when you turn it on. This prevents a surge from damaging your generator and appliances.
  • Be sure to keep children and pets away from the generator, which could burn them.
  • Shut down the generator properly. Before shutting down a generator, turn off and unplug all appliances and equipment being powered by the generator.
  • Remember maintenance between uses. It is also a good idea to inspect the fuel and oil filters, spark plug, oil level and fuel quality and to start the generator on a regular basis before an emergency situation occurs.

Like us on Facebook and view our website for up-to-date information.

Stay Safe!